661-878-9930

ADDICTION TREATMENT

Achieve long-term sobriety with support from addiction medications.

Outpatient Heroin Addiction Treatment

Synergy Recovery Services offers discrete, private and professional medical outpatient treatment for heroin addiction. Heroin addiction is a serious disease that requires prompt treatment. Contact Synergy Recovery Services at 661-878-9930 if you or a loved one needs help.

The facts of heroin addiction have changed over the years. Now, you’re just as likely to find someone from your garden club addicted to heroin as someone on the streets. Heroin addiction doesn’t discriminate by age, race, gender or social circumstances. It’s a dangerous drug that can lead to addiction quickly.

Fortunately, there are many treatment options for heroin addiction. Outpatient heroin addiction treatment is available at Synergy Recovery Services. We offer medical detox and maintenance for heroin addiction as well as several other programs to help you free yourself form heroin addiction and successfully recover from alcohol or any drug addiction.

Dr. Trobisch Discusses Opioid Addiction in Kern County

Watch Synergy's addiction doctor, Jan Trobisch, talk about heroin addiction in Kern County on Channel 17 News. 512 people of Kern County overdosed on opioids in 2013.

Watch
video

Heroin Addiction Treatment in Bakersfield, CA

It’s absolutely vital that if you or someone you love is taking heroin, you seek prompt treatment. Dr. Trobisch at Synergy Recovery Services is a board-certified addiction medicine specialist. He has extensive professional experience treating heroin addiction with a combination of prescription medications (Suboxone®, Vivitrol® and others, such as the lastest form of heroin treatment: Probuphine implants), counseling and lifestyle management that has been effective for many clients for many years. Dr. Trobisch has been treating patients with addictions – especially heroin addiction – since 2004.

At Synergy Recovery Services, we offer medications to help your body acclimate to a life without heroin. These medications include SUBOXONE® (Buprenorphine), a long-acting drug that can help you taper off of heroin. Dr. Trobisch may also prescribe other medications to help you safely and effectively stop using heroin. Several medications are available today for the treatment of withdrawal symptoms and to prevent a relapse.

All of our treatment options are available on an outpatient basis. This includes daily classes, individual- and group counseling as well as lectures at our professional Bakersfield office. Our discrete, spa-like setting provides a comfortable and confidential environment for treatment.

Not sure if you’re struggling with a heroin addiction? Click the button below to take our free Addiction Test.

Take Addiction Test

Heroin Addiction Facts

Bakersfield, California is on a major drug trafficking highway. According to the Department of Justice, although heroin is less often abused than methamphetamine in the local region, it is becoming a bigger problem. This is because many people are addicted to opioid painkillers (e.g. Vicodin®, Norco®, Oxycontin®, Fentanyl®, etc.).

Opioid painkillers such as prescription pain medicines act on the same centers of the brain as heroin. Many people find that, over time, they need greater amounts of these medicines to satisfy their addiction. When the brain has adapted to the frequent influence of opioid painkillers, people will get severe withdrawal symptoms and continue to use just to avoid the withdrawal and to feel “normal”. When painkillers can’t be obtained due to a higher price on the black market, people often turn to heroin to achieve a greater high or just feel “normal”. The result is heroin addiction.

Opioid addiction has become a problem of epidemic proportions over the past 15 years. Along with the opioid addiction epidemic, there have been many more deaths from opioid overdose since 2000. A report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) showed that in 2014 there were 18,893 overdose deaths from opioid painkillers and 10,574 deaths from heroin overdose. In comparison, in the year 2000 4,400 people died from opioid painkiller overdose and 1,842 from heroin. This is a 5-fold increase over the past 15 years!

What Is Heroin?

Heroin is a drug made from morphine. Morphine comes from opium poppy, which grows throughout the Middle East. Opium is one of the original pain-relief drugs. It affects cells in the brain, turning down pain signals as well as increasing “feel good” brain chemicals.

Heroin does the same thing. It makes users feel both happy and pain-free. When heroin is used, it converts back into morphine inside the body. Morphine binds with opioid receptors which suppress pain signals from the body. When you break your ankle, pain fibers send the pain signals to your brain, which tells you to stop moving because you have an injury. Without a working pain system, you could damage your body permanently. Pain is your body’s way of making you stop and take care of yourself.

Opioid receptors are primarily located in the brain stem. This is the part of your central nervous system that regulates automatic life functions, including breathing, blood pressure and other functions. When you take too much heroin, these systems become suppressed. That’s why people die from heroin overdoses. Too much heroin can stop your breathing.

How Heroin Is Used

Heroin is sold as a white or brown powder. It can be snorted, smoked or injected. All three methods of taking heroin help it enter the brain quickly, where it’s effects are felt almost immediately. This fast-acting effect makes heroin powerful and highly addictive.

The Changing Face of Heroin Addiction

In the past, society considered heroin an inner-city drug. Today, however, you’re just as likely to find heroin abuse in the locker room of your child’s school in the suburbs as you are on the streets of Los Angeles. Researchers believe that the rise in prescription painkiller use among the middle and upper classes has predisposed a whole generation to heroin abuse and addiction.

In 2012, the Guardian reported that doctors wrote nearly 260 million prescriptions for opioid painkillers in the United States. That’s almost one prescription for every man, woman and child. 99% of the world hydrocodone (e.g. Vicodin® or Norco®) is supplied to the US.

A shift in doctor’s attitudes towards pain management occurred gradually over the past several decades. As more prescription painkillers were approved by the FDA, more doctors offered them to their patients. Changes in drug classifications also made them easier to refill these prescriptions by phone, making them more accessible to patients and preferable by busy doctors. When prescriptions can be refilled by phone without seeing patients a second or third time, it’s easy for doctors to miss some of the warning signs that their patients are becoming addicted to painkillers.

Prescription painkillers act on the same opioid receptors in the brain that heroin targets. When you take any opioids, they change how your brain receives pain signals. The more you take, the more these changes become etched into your body. Over time, these changes make your body crave higher amounts of painkillers.

The rise in prescription painkiller abuse has created a new market for heroin. Drug dealers seized upon this opportunity and began offering teens illegal prescription painkillers. Over time, this created demand for heroin.

Heroin has always been throughout the United States, but now more than ever, it’s striking in the heart of suburbia. Law enforcement officials responding to a DEA survey show heroin is now one of their chief worries. Stories of teens ordering heroin by texting their dealers and receiving orders under the front door mat in the heart of Small Town, USA aren’t unheard of. When heroin becomes that easy to obtain, it’s become a national epidemic.

Take the Steps to Get Help Today

Through a combination of medical management for heroin addiction, counseling, classes and other lifestyle changes, you can be free from your addiction*. For more information, please call Synergy Recovery Services at 661-878-9930 or fill out our confidential online form today.

Contact Us Now

  •   Excellent staff and wait times, very accommodating as well. Spends more than 2 minutes with patients like a lot of... Read More

    thumb David Dawson
    7/19/2018
  •   The staff is always extremely friendly and really helpful. The counselors are really great, they care immensely about their patients... Read More

    thumb Bijan Mirkazemi
    1/21/2018
  •   Synergy is the best thing to have happened to me. The staff and clients are so caring and understanding. ... Read More

    thumb Ashley Wood-Harmon
    10/28/2016
  •   Synergy Recovery Services is a great place to get help. I highly recommend those struggling to get treatment there.

    thumb Raul Connie Rodriguez
    7/04/2017
  •   I can't say enough about Synergy and their amazing caring staff. I started Syngery with a desperate call asking for... Read More

    thumb Traci B.
    1/15/2018
  •   Synergy has stuck by my side through everything because of them I am happily sober�

    thumb Alyxandria Marie Wilson
    6/08/2017
  •   I can't thank Synergy enough for what they have done for me and my family due to my addiction. They... Read More

    thumb Saijo Bryan
    5/16/2018
  •   I believe I have ah chance to enjoy a sober life thank you LORD. AMEN

    thumb William Evans III
    6/11/2015
  •   I can't thank Synergy enough for what they have done for me and my family due to my addiction. They... Read More

    thumb Saijo B.
    3/03/2018
  •   I can't say enough about Synergy and their amazing caring staff. I started Syngery with a desperate call asking for... Read More

    thumb Traci Brown
    1/16/2018
  •   There's no better place to get treatment for yourself or a loved one. The entire staff is friendly, professional and... Read More

    thumb April S.
    1/10/2018
  •   Marissa and the entire staff have done amazing things for their clients. I've heard nothing but good things about Synergy... Read More

    thumb April M Sugden
    2/03/2017
  •   Awesome New Facility - Great Job on the Grand Opening! It's exciting to see Addiction Treatment (Quality Treatment) growing in... Read More

    thumb Dennis N Erica Farmer
    11/16/2017
  •   Synergy has brought hope and light to my life. Most people who come here are in a very dark place... Read More

    thumb Traci Brown-Rhoades
    10/21/2017
  •   Very nice atmosphere, Counselors and Doctors are very caring and understanding

    thumb Cain English
    1/16/2018
  •   I attended synergy recovery for addiction. I loved it there. I could honestly say it is the best out patient... Read More

    thumb Jody Clanahan
    7/11/2018
  •   Safe, confidential, experienced, personal, and friendly, that is my experience with Synergy Recovery Services. The counselors have "been there, done... Read More

    thumb Dale K.
    1/14/2018
  •   There's no better place to get treatment for yourself or a loved one. The entire staff is friendly, professional and... Read More

    thumb April Sugden
    3/19/2018
  •   I can't believe it's been almost a year since I check myself into the Synergy Recovery out patient program. I... Read More

    thumb Richard G.
    7/13/2018
  •   The people that work here truly care about you. I love Synergy

    thumb Denise Mohr-Roy
    11/23/2015
Blog

addiction-treatment

How to Get the Most Out […]

Committing to a rehab program is the first step to recovery, but attendance is not enough. The early stages of combatting addiction could leave you feeling vulnerable. It’s easy to close yourself off from treatment, […]

27.09.2018
Learn more
Jan Trobisch

Jan Trobisch

Synergy Lifestyle Center

addiction-treatment

Reasons People Fail to […]

Why don’t people want to quit drugs? Most times it’s not a question of want. It’s a question of will. Addiction is a disease that impact’s a person’s willpower and decision-making skills. While using drug and […]

13.09.2018
Learn more
Jan Trobisch

Jan Trobisch

Synergy Lifestyle Center

addiction-treatment

How to Tell Someone […]

Should you tell others you have an addiction? When you’re serious about overcoming your addiction, it’s important to reach out to your loved ones. This tough but courageous step is important for your recovery. Here […]

30.08.2018
Learn more
Jan Trobisch

Jan Trobisch

Synergy Lifestyle Center

addiction-treatment

Three Tips for Staging […]

Helping a sibling who is struggling with addiction seems overwhelming. Whether it’s a sister or brother with the drug addiction, you want to support them without enabling their dysfunctional behavior. Siblings see […]

18.07.2018
Learn more
Jan Trobisch

Jan Trobisch

Synergy Lifestyle Center

addiction-treatment

How to Return to Work […]

How can you get your job back after rehab? Going back to work after rehab is one of the top priorities for recovering addicts. But often they feel intimidated by some of the barriers between them and employment. They […]

09.07.2018
Learn more
Jan Trobisch

Jan Trobisch

Synergy Lifestyle Center

Smartlipo Event on 11/12/15

"Get Rid of Those Unwanted Inches" Smartlipo Event on November 12 at 5:30PM. RSVP today at 661-878-9100 to learn about the this new minimally invasive laser liposuction and get exclusive event pricing for this revolutionary new procedure.